Basic Travel Information For Panama City

I’ve travelled to Panama at least a dozen times and stayed at countless beach hotels in Panama on my travels. You’re probably going to need a little background information when you first travel to Panama before you go and even before you start looking for hotels in Panama City. I believe Panama is one of those undiscovered tourist destinations which is only just now opening up to visitors. So it’s one of those undiscovered secrets that will rapidly change as more and more people from North America search for another sunny vacation spot apart from the traditional Caribbean islands such as Cuba, Mexico, the Bahamas, and Jamaica etc.

Location of Panama

Panama is officially known as the Republic of Panama. It is most southern country in Central America on an the isthmus which connects North and South America. It lies between two great seas, the Pacific Ocean in the and the Caribbean Sea in the North. The total population of Panama is about 3.1 million people but this number is expanding with the increasing number of retirees who are selecting Panama as a home.

The Economy of Panama

As far as the economy goes, Panama is the third biggest economy in Central America. It is the largest consumer of resources in Central America. The unemployment rate is about 7.2% and has a poverty rate of about 20%. However, its infrastructure and economy is solid and growing. For many tourists, it’s becoming a new vacation destination for travelers from North America who search for a place to escape the bad winter weather. Its industries are centered on the commerce, banking, tourism, private industry and trading benefitting from its privileged geographic situation. In Panama City, there is lots of construction going on and real estate is booming. Retirees are heading south to check out Panama as a retirement destination. All this will come as a surprise for those who don’t know much about Panama.

Currency of Panama

American dollars are used here mostly. The national currency is the balboa.

What to See in Panama

The tourist to Panama will find there are lots of delights to discover in Panama as well as the famous Panama Canal. Although Panama is most famous because of the Panama Canal, the country is famous for snorkeling, bird watching and hiking. The miles and miles of white sand beaches of the coastline are splendid and unspoiled.

Security Warning for Some Areas of Panama

You must avoid certain areas in Panama because of smugglers, bandits, Colombian guerrillas and paramilitary forces in Darién Province from the Columbian border along the Tuira River to Yaviza because they target tourists. Much of Darién National Park is okay, but be advised to take a travel guide with you or stay away from it altogether. Another area to avoid is the Madden Dam in Chagre National Park for the same reasons.

The Weather in Panama

When is the best time of the year to vacation in Panama? There are actually two different seasons, a dry season which starts mid-December and lasts to mid-April and a rainy season which starts from mid-April to December. On the Caribbean coast of Panama, it seems to rain all the time, but less so in February to March, September to October. Days are generally hot throughout the year, with an average of 32 degrees Celsius, (90 degrees Fahrenheit to approximately 22 degrees Celsius (72 degrees Fahrenheit in the evenings. During the rainy season, the humidity is quite high. If you are traveling to the mountains, it is cooler with a temperature ranging from about 10 – 18 degrees Celsius (50 – 64 degrees Fahrenheit throughout the year.

So you have it now, a basic introduction to the Republic of Panama the place you have decided to explore for your next southern trip away from the winter storms of North America. Not a country to be missed.

Astral Travel Information: An Introduction To Astral Projection

Have you ever dreamt about your mind leaving your body and traveling to faraway places, watching people and events unfold in front of you but not being able to interact, or find yourself feeling awake but looking down at yourself sleeping calmly?

If so, there is a reasonable chance that you have already had an unconscious out of body experience already, you just didn’t know what it was and likely believed it was just another dream. If you are new to the realm of Astral Travel you probably have a lot of questions.

This article will answer some of the most common questions related to the Astral Realms and Astral Projection.

What Is Astral Projection? The terms Astral Projection or Travel, Remove Viewing, and Out Of Body Experience are mostly interchangeable. Astral Projection refers to a state where your conscious mind is operating independently of your physical body.

What Is The Astral Plane? This is the place where the thoughts, dreams, and memories of everyone in the world exist, collected together into a plane far greater and more expansive than the physical world we live in. In some works this plane is likened to the Hindu Akasha – a plane of existence where every thought and action that has ever occurred is recorded.

What Happens During Astral Travel? Often referred to as an Out-Of-Body-Experience, your conscious mind leaves your body and travels independently of it. This most commonly occurs during periods of sleep or deep relaxation – when the conditions are best for this kind of travel.

Can Anyone Perform Astral Travel? There is nothing to stop anyone from learning to project, but society conditions us to believe otherwise, and this belief prevents most people from ever exploring their potential.

Why Would You Want To Astral Project? The reasons vary, for some it’s an exploration of what else is out there, and what is within. For others they hope to find spiritual calm or enlightenment. For some it’s scientific, to prove or disproof the existence of astral travelers.

How Can I Learn? There are many techniques available to try, and because everyone is unique they don’t all work for everyone. You will need to educate yourself on the various techniques, to prepare yourself both mentally and physically for the exercises you will need to perform.

Did you know it is possible to achieve astral travel in as little as one full week, just seven days?

London Travel Information

London is a place where the historic past and the vibrant present come alive. A blend of history, ground-breaking architecture and culture has created an amazing and constantly evolving city.

London is one of the world’s most remarkable and exciting cities and has something to offer every type of traveller. Split into five distinctive areas, London’s east, west, north, south and central areas all offer a very different perspective on this vibrant metropolis that embraces the diverse cultures of its population, reflected through cuisine, shops, music and colourful festivals.

West London attracts millions of visitors each year with its live music venues, parks and riverside villages. It’s renowned for its plush and expensive areas such as Kensington and Belgravia and is the home of many major attractions, from the Royal Albert Hall to Kew gardens, and has excellent shopping grounds and beautiful architecture. Some of the country’s top chefs have opened fine restaurants and bars in Hammersmith, Chiswick and Ealing, and whether your preference is Caribbean, Indian or Oriental – try Edgware Road’s Oriental City foodhall – you’ll find something to tease your taste buds. Famous for Chelsea and Fulham football clubs and the new National Stadium, built to replace Wembley Stadium, West London is also home to Wembley Arena, the Hammersmith Apollo and the BBC’s headquarters in White City. London’s reputation as a destination for fine food continues to grow and has been rated as “the world’s best place to eat”, underlining the fact that it has become one of the gourmet capitals of the world.

At the heart of Central London, you will find everything usually associated with a trip to London from the lively streets of the West End and Theatreland, to the historic sites of the Houses of Parliament and Buckingham Palace. Most places within this area are in walking distance of each other so with a basic city map, you’ll be able find your way around easily and take in some sights on the way. A more recent landmark is the world’s largest observation wheel, the BA London Eye, standing 135m high beside the River Thames and the country’s most popular paid-for attraction, welcoming 3.7 million visitors annually. Also home to the National Gallery, the delightful South Bank, Chinatown and the unique atmosphere of Soho. The River Thames divides the city into northern and southern halves, with Central London loosely described as being within the loop of the Underground’s Circle Line to the north bank of the river. Haute cuisine now comes from India and the Orient (try Yauatcha, the capital’s first dim sum restaurant) as well as from Europe and Britain (head to Lindsay House for modern British, or Rules for traditional English). There’s everything from top-end, five star restaurants to café-style options and plenty in between. What could be more English than afternoon tea? The Art Deco Palm Court at London’s Park Lane Hotel has become a member of Britain’s Tea Guild, which promotes high standards in the art of afternoon tea. Renowned for its elegant teas since the 1930s, it is the perfect escape from the bustle of the capital’s streets. The hotel has also featured in well-known movies, from James Bond’s Golden Eye to The Poseidon Adventure. Like all great cities, London never stands still. Approaching the magnificent National Gallery, you no longer dodge London’s traffic, for the north side of Trafalgar Square is pedestrianised – and site of an open-air café and regular entertainment. (And there is less traffic in the city altogether, since a charge, now £8, has been levied to drive in the centre).

Shoppers can find all the best high-street names in North London with a visit to Brent Cross, plus boutiques and restaurants in the villages of Islington, Crouch End, Walthamstow, Hampstead and Muswell Hill. Those in search of international flavours should head to the Turkish enclave of Green Lanes – if you time it right you might catch a music festival in Finsbury Park. And further to the north is the 19th century Alexandra Palace, set in 196 acres of parkland and offering ice-skating in the winter and open-air events in the summer. Not far away is Epping Forest, a 10,000-year-old woodland that was once a hunting ground of Henry VIII, the RAF Museum in Hendon, which boasts more than 100 planes, and a museum dedicated to William Morris, founder of the British Arts and Crafts movement. From Richmond upon Thames in the west to Bromley in the east, South London is packed full of history, culture and charming neighbourhoods. Picturesque riverside settings provide the perfect opportunity to roll out the picnic blanket. Outdoor attractions include the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, the London Wetland Centre – 100 acres of wetlands in Barnes – and Richmond Park, London’s largest open space, where deer roam free. Historical buildings such as Down House – where Charles Darwin wrote The Origin of Species and Hampton Court Palace are brimming with colourful tales. Shoppers will marvel at the choice of shopping in places like Clapham, Barnes, Kingston upon Thames and Croydon. Children find the capital especially exciting and there’s so much for families to do, from a ride on one of the River Thames cruise boats, to a visit to a museum or a trip to a theme park.

Nowhere does the old sit more comfortably beside the new than in East London, where diverse cultures and maritime heritage make for great exploring. This is London’s fastest growing area as it prepares for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Head to the Bangladeshi and Indian restaurants on Brick Lane for a delicious and authentic taste of the Asian sub-continent or visit the once rundown areas of Hoxton and Hackney, now transformed into buzzing scenes boasting great nightlife and eclectic markets like Spitalfields and Columbia Road. London has a new Sunday market in the heart of the trendy and ethnic Brick Lane area of the East End. The Sunday (Up) Market is within the 11-acre site of the Old Truman Brewery, within walking distance of Liverpool Street station. Products on sale, from a wide range of traders, include vintage clothes and shoes, hand-made handbags, jewellery, art, lighting, home-wares, accessories, food and drink. The market aims to be a platform for designer-makers and is set to join the capital’s other markets, including Old Spitalfields, E1; Camden Lock, NW1; Greenwich, SE10 and Portobello Road, W10, as ‘must see’ attractions for shoppers.

Despite a population of over seven million, more than 30% of London is made up of parks and green space, greater than any other city of its size in the world. This space provides the perfect opportunity for walks, relaxation or sporting activities. London also offers some of the best shopping opportunities in the world. From major department stores to designer boutiques and street markets – the choice is immense. As if that wasn’t enough, London is hard to beat when it comes to nightlife. There are huge numbers of restaurants, pubs, cinemas, theatres and nightclubs plus live music and comedy venues. So, at any time of day, whatever the weather, you’ll always find something extra special in London. For those on a budget, in the last few years several economy hotel chains have moved into the city. There’s plenty of choice from names such as Travelodge and Holiday Inn Express. Attractive weekend rates are available at some of London’s best hotels, to attract leisure business once the corporate clients have gone home. London is a very accessible city; it has five international airports, an efficient road network and extensive Underground, train, bus, and taxi services. The city is famous for a wealth of history and culture. Home to Britain’s national art collections, the Royal family and a host of major attractions, London’s rich history, striking architecture and over 200 museums offer a unique cultural experience.

Not surprisingly the capital has become a mecca for visitors and a great place to live. There is something to appeal to everyone and whatever your interests may be, the city has it covered.

Cheap Flights and Air Fare: Resources for Finding the Best Travel Deals

More and more people are taking advantage of fewer restrictions and barriers to travel to see parts of the world both near and far. As one of the safest modes of travel available, many travelers are turning to the large number of airlines giving us access to dozens of locations around the globe. The one barrier to finding and booking flights has been price. Historically, flights to both remote and near locales have been costly, but by taking advantage of a few easy to access resources, anyone can find cheap flights to almost anywhere in the world.

Of all the benefits we receive from ubiquitous Internet access in this country, one of the best has been easy price comparisons. Any product can be researched for easy price comparisons to help you find the best deal. Same goes for travel but there are a few things to look out for. For one thing, many websites just show fares from some other discount sites known as fare consolidators. This means that many travel sites are just recycling the same fares. You’ll want to use dedicated price comparison sites to find the best fares. Also some sites, due to the way they are programmed, don’t always have up to date fare info. For smaller sites, very often the air fare information is stale and the actual price can be very different.

There are a few large sites that strike special deals with the airlines allowing them access to the latest fare information. Sites like Travelocity, Expedia and Hotwire, all have access to information other sites don’t have, so they might be a better resource for finding great travel deals. Nevertheless, these sites can also give less than desirable results. The reason is that as a requirement of having access to the latest data, they are prevented from showing certain prices at certain times by certain airlines. so that depending on where you are travelling and when, even the best sites might not have the best fares.

One way you can get past the negative aspects of online air fare searches, is to move your search offline. This means shutting off the computer and taking a trip to your local travel agent. Companies that are a part of the travel industry are generally a close knit group. They want to protect the business models that have made them so much money over the years. So many airlines, along with hotel and tour operators, save some of their best deals for distribution by the legions of travel agents that they’ve worked with sometimes for decades. Going to your local travel agent might just give you the best price since most travel agent fees are flat and they have no reason to try to sell you on the highest fares for your trip.

While the Internet can offer great resources in general for finding cheap flights and air fare, the best resources are often brick and mortar travel agencies. Not only is there not impetus to push you towards the highest fare, (unlike airline affiliates), you gain the additional advantage of a personal hands on approach to finding the best fare and booking your trip.